Pop Art Canvas Prints - Just A Passing Trend?

Pop Art Canvas Prints - Just A Passing Trend?



Pop Art is almost the most significant fine art styles of the 50's and 60's. The Pop artists turned to pop culture and advertising for subjects to fashion figurative images that defied the modernist hierarchy. Separating form the sixties modernist convention of abstract expressionism, Pop Art canvas prints appeared to certain observers to be meaningless and reactionary. However, they essentially signify a significant period in the history of twentieth-century artwork. Pop art canvas art separated from more staid techniques of classic fine art during the Nineteen Fifties and Nineteen Sixties, creating vastly separate ideas of artistic representation.

In pop art, a vivid reflection of popular society is mirrored in lurid colours and fussy, occasionally hardly identifiable artistic features. Urban culture, rubbish, patchwork, comic books, street art and photograph mosaic are typical design fundamentals that had been broadly utilized by designers and trend-setters a few years ago. During the early 60's the heterosexual world was starting to understand the camp mindset. Due to the fact camp was observed as the victory of style over substance, when the Pop artists elevated their detested media canvas prints to the sector of "high art," they put on show the camp attraction to, and dedication to the marginal.

As a visual art trend pop art canvas prints in the mid Fifties began merging contemporary art into the more sophisticated advertising world. The community in America didn’t have a huge jump to make into pop art works of art, the distinctive and striking works of art which appeared from the pop art fashion are ones which are able to even find importance now. Pop Art witnessed its design aesthetic gradually vanishing following the late 60's. Slightly ironically it was eclipsed by abstract expressionism and assimilated by the same capitalist advertising sources it had used for its primary inspiration. Pop art canvas prints will be forever credited for a legacy of brash fashion concepts, and camp publicity campaigns.